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Fewer Districts Anticipate Freezing Pay for 2019-2020

April 30, 2019 • Patti Ellis

Fewer districts anticipate freezing pay for 2019–2020

Understanding circumstances may change because of pending school finance and teacher pay increase legislation from the current session of the Texas legislature, Texas school districts have reported their anticipated pay increase decisions for the 2019–2020 school year.

This year, fewer responding public school districts (20 percent) anticipate freezing pay for 2019–2020 (down from 28 percent last year).
 

Teacher expected percentage raise by district

SOURCE: TASB HR Services, April 2019

In ESCs 04–Houston, 05–Beaumont, and 12–Waco, 90 percent or more of responding districts expect to give a raise, while less than half of participating districts in ESC 14–Abilene plan to raise pay. In Central Texas, 88 percent of districts in ESC 13–Austin and 77 percent of districts in ESC 20–San Antonio project pay increases for their employees.

Of districts across Texas planning a salary increase, the median pay raise is 2 percent for each surveyed pay group—teachers, administrators/professionals, and clerical paraprofessionals/auxiliary. Last year’s median teacher pay increase was 2 percent, according to the 2018–2019 TASB Salary Survey.

Looking at pay increase percentages for teachers statewide, 29 percent expect to give a 2 percent raise followed by 26 percent intending to give an increase of 3 percent. Twenty-seven percent of districts expect to provide an increase less than 2 percent.

Anticipated district pay raise percentageSOURCE: TASB HR Services, April 2019

A breakdown by region shows ESCs 18–Midland (3 percent), 02–Corpus Christi (2.5 percent), 04–Houston (2.5 percent), and 05–Beaumont (2.5 percent) expect the highest teacher pay hikes, while ESC 17–Lubbock (1.5 percent) reported the lowest median teacher increase. Administrator/professional and nonexempt pay increases in these regions generally followed similar trends. 

Focusing on the smallest and largest districts in Texas (by student enrollment) reveals nearly 68 percent of districts with fewer than 1,000 students plan to provide a pay raise. In large districts with 10,000 or more students, nearly all (93 percent) intend to give a pay raise.

In addition, we asked districts how pay increases would be calculated. For teachers, a little over one-third (37 percent) indicated a step increase only, while 28 percent reported a raise based on the pay range midpoint or market value. For administrators/professionals and clerical paraprofessionals/auxiliary, 46 percent and 45 percent, respectively, indicated a pay increase based on the pay range midpoint or market value.

The poll was conducted in April 2019 and includes responses from 560 Texas public school districts across all enrollment sizes. It’s the eighth year HR Services has surveyed member school districts, providing an early picture of pay increases statewide. Projected pay increases reported by participants may be pending final board approval.

Tagged: "Pay increases", Surveys, "Teacher Pay"